Nature Positive, Carbon Positive Solutions

Achieving a Nature Positive world involves halting and reversing current trends of ecological destruction that affect biodiversity. Preserving our flora and fauna plays a significant role in combatting climate change. A loss of one species, whether plant or animal, can significantly impact other species, including us as humans, and have devastating impacts to our environment.

Nature Positive Goals at COP15

Taking action on climate means reducing and setting goals for our emissions of CO2e, but what does it mean to set goals for nature? One thing we know is that, like climate, it’s urgent. The World must set goals to stabilise species loss over the next ten years. The 2022 COP15 conference on biodiversity will begin on December 7th in Montreal, Canada.

During this decade of restoration, can the World set goals and take action to rebuild and restore our ecosystems? More than 300 civil society organisations have called for an agreement to be negotiated at COP15 to reverse nature loss and secure a Nature Positive world this decade.

What does it mean to be nature positive?

Achieving a Nature Positive world involves halting and reversing current trends of ecological destruction that affect biodiversity. Preserving our flora and fauna plays a significant role in combatting climate change. Many of our ecosystems are also some of our most valuable carbon stores, and with their destruction, we lose the ability to become carbon positive. A loss of one species, whether plant or animal, can significantly impact other species, including us as humans, and have devastating impacts to our environment.

Being Nature Positive calls for the recognition that tackling climate change should also strongly focus on protecting biodiversity. The impacts of climate change and biodiversity loss are intertwined. Nature Positive actions mean:

  • Putting our ecosystems into a state where they are restoring and regenerating rather than declining
  • Measuring metrics such as tree cover, the integrity of habitats and the number of species
  • Valuing nature and its services that we all need and rely upon for our health and well-being.

The tree planting and revegetation projects we develop at Carbon Positive Australia are planned from the outset to be nature positive, protect and restore ecosystems, and remove CO2e from the atmosphere.

At Eurardy, alongside Bush Heritage Australia, we are restoring unique quandong heathland that is home to flora species found nowhere else in the world, and the site is located on one of 32 worldwide biodiversity hotspots.

We are planting with Bush Block Guardians this year at Warralakin near Westonia in Western Australia; this 185-hectare site is home to ten listed threatened species. We will be restoring this area to health and protecting species for the future.

And our work continues at Nimbin, where we are creating much-needed Koala habitat and linkage between two national parks. We also have big plans for 2023/2024 to plant trees and vegetation as forage foods for the endangered Black Carnaby’s Cockatoo in the Northern Wheatbelt.

While reducing our C02 and equivalent emissions is essential to limit the impacts of climate change, developing a ‘Nature Positive’ approach ensures that carbon capture obtains more comprehensive social, environmental, and economic benefits. 

At Carbon Positive Australia, we have a vision of a carbon and nature positive Australia.

You can be a part of the solution by:

  • Supporting social justice issues for Indigenous people who have understood the importance of nature and our relationship with nature for millennia
  • Supporting projects that have high biodiversity outcomes
  • Taking part in community and citizen science activities, such as bird counts, insects counts & community tree planting

You can support Carbon Positive Australia’s planting projects by donating here.



The vision of the framework is a world of living in harmony with nature where: “By 2050, biodiversity is valued, conserved, restored and wisely used, maintaining ecosystem services, sustaining a healthy planet and delivering benefits essential for all people.”

Carbon Positive Australia has been doing Nature Positive restoration projects for over two decades. Here is an example.

Intense competition for land resources in Australia has resulted in continued declines in the amount and condition of our land-based natural capital – native vegetation, soil and biodiversity. This means that the overall state of Australia's land and soil is poor. Many parts of Australia are highly degraded, and native vegetation has been extensively cleared. The widespread reduction in capacity of native vegetation to support Australia's unique biodiversity is exacerbated by declining habitat quality, climate change and the prevalence of invasive species.

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